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Garden steps
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Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9738

PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 18 8:16 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

You can get non-slip edging for steps, and that is probably sensible whatever you use to make them. Brick, stone, concrete or wood all get slippery if they keep getting wet.

jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 26610
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 18 10:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

May stretch it longer than 1.2m, but I'm struggling to justify anything more than joists and decking steps. I'm curious if I visit B&Q for the joists, whether they will have removed the display wooden steps they have had for more than a year that are not only flimsy to look at, but are actually broken.... has anyone actually bought these I wonder, what sort of idiot would?

Shan



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 7515
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 18 11:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

What about wood frame and gravels steps:


jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 26610
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 18 11:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

easy enough on an actual slope. This is on thin air! the lower deck the steps go down to, is about 40cm from actual ground level.

Shan



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 7515
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 18 12:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

A series of wooden box platforms filled with gravel.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5212
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 18 1:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That would be a lot of weight, particularly when waterlogged

There's a reason that most steps are made of wood.....

Metal could be a fetching contemporary design accent and a home job if you have access to a welder, though that's something I'd rather buy pre-fab or hire out.

I think you can purchase stringers and treads and customize to the length/height you need and width, and fasten with hardware if welders (individuals or machinery) are not readily available.

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1882
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 18 3:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

At an arboretum I once saw wooden steps with chicken wire tightly fastened to the tread. Non slip when wet.

If there are sufficient joists / supports beneath the treads the steps should be secure and stable.

Make steps from locust or redwood or teak or cypress and they'll be rot resistant. All depends on what's available, what you are willing to spend, and ecological concerns.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9738

PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 18 7:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Chicken wire is quite a common covering for steps Jam Lady. On home ones it might be all right, but it tends to wear and break and needs replacing fairly frequently. I have seen it on too many wooden surfaces in the UK in a rather dilapidated and dangerous condition, but is good if kept maintained.

jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 26610
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 18 8:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I'm thinking the steps will be decking and maybe as long as 50cm, so not much more of a slip risk than the deck itself.

I have decided on constructing this with basic joisting. It's the cheapest, simplest, laziest approach, which was half the reason for posting! If something feels like its ticking all the "cop out" boxes it raises an alarm.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33857
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 18 2:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

with good carpentry and pre treated timber it should be safe and cost effective.

jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 26610
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 18 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:
with good carpentry and pre treated timber it should be safe and cost effective.


Well given the frame will be hidden, I'll settle for shoddy carpentry and large coach screws.

Shan



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 7515
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 18 9:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Sounds familiar...

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9738

PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 18 7:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I find decking is fine across the plank, but can be very slippery the other way. Watch out for it staying wet or getting leaves on.

Shan



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 7515
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 18 8:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I wonder if one could apply some sort of anti-slip substance to it?

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33857
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 18 12:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Shan wrote:
I wonder if one could apply some sort of anti-slip substance to it?


varnish and sand is cheap and effective especially on sawn timber. chicken wire is ace if not very long lasting.

specialist paints, strips and plates are available

large coach screws/bolts are rather handy, iirc there are a good selection of brackets etc as well so as the carpentry part is little more than cutting to length and screwing together.

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