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Rainbow flower border
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Fee



Joined: 21 Mar 2005
Posts: 15902
Location: Surrey Heath
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 18 2:17 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Actually, looking at this, perhaps a mixed border of all the colours of the rainbow rather than lines from back to front. Like this a lot and it would be more doable/maneagable.


Fee



Joined: 21 Mar 2005
Posts: 15902
Location: Surrey Heath
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 18 2:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That said, a more structured, tiered border style rainbow might be stunning in a sensory garden, a feast for the eyes!


gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1718
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 18 2:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I know nothing about flowers, but guess that finding the varieties of those plants you select, that all flower together to give the rainbow effect, may be a challenge. I await the outcome with interest. I know nothing about flower growing.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5265
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 18 2:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Easier to avoid "dead" patches where all species in that sector were pre- or post- blooming as well

Fee



Joined: 21 Mar 2005
Posts: 15902
Location: Surrey Heath
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 18 3:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I'd hope to grow as many as possible from seed, Gregotyn

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1718
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 18 3:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It is talking them into flowering together that is important, Fee. It would be past my ability. At best I used to grow pansies for sale as a child. Now my idea is that if I or a sheep or horse can't eat it I don't grow it!

sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 41906
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 18 3:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The first one's do-able. the second one's gong to involve huge quantities of bedding plants being bought in unless you're prepared to have it look like nothing much most or the time. IMHO.

Fee



Joined: 21 Mar 2005
Posts: 15902
Location: Surrey Heath
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 18 3:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Ah,yep, with you. I think the first is the way to go actually, can make sure there's at least overlap of flowering season of different flowers and if there are gaps it won't look too cack.

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1943
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 18 4:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

1. Perennials from seed will take a minimum of 2 years, more generally 3 years to flowering size. Columbines are relatively quick, but also short lived.

2. Cultivars are true-to-name so you are certain of what they look like / how they perform. Most perennial cultivars are propagated asexually - by division or from cutting or tissue culture.

3. Since you are not certain what arrangement you want for your rainbow border I would suggest starting with annuals to trial the color scheme. If you like something, make notes in a garden journal and look for perennials that copy the color scheme.

4. Yellows are the most intense colors to our eye when viewed in daylight. Lavender / violet / purple intensify towards evening.

5. Colors adjacent to each other on a color wheel are harmonious. Colors across from each other on a color wheel are said to be "complementary' which means they are in strongest opposition. A little goes a long way to accent the flower garden. For example - majority of flowers in blue / violet / lavender with a little yellow or pale orange to accent.

6. Silver foliage helps to harmonize flower colors.

7. Go to a paint store and collect as many color cards as you can discreetly take away. Lay them out on a green background and rearrange the different tints / tones / shade to find some combinations that please you.

8. In general, annuals have an extended flowering period. Perennials bloom for a matter of weeks (two or three, over here.) And you can only have one plant in one space. Figure on 18 inches by 18 inches for perennials. Peonys want even more. Annuals in many cases are good with 12 inches by 12 inches.

9. Buy perennials in smaller = less expensive sizes, fill in with annuals for the first year or two.

wellington womble



Joined: 08 Nov 2004
Posts: 14962
Location: East Midlands
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 18 5:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Fee wrote:
Ah,yep, with you. I think the first is the way to go actually, can make sure there's at least overlap of flowering season of different flowers and if there are gaps it won't look too cack.


Annuals will give you a longer flowering season, and you can play around more with them. I’ll bring the book up sometime.

Fee



Joined: 21 Mar 2005
Posts: 15902
Location: Surrey Heath
PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 18 5:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Top advice, Jam Lady!

Fee



Joined: 21 Mar 2005
Posts: 15902
Location: Surrey Heath
PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 18 5:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

wellington womble wrote:
Fee wrote:
Ah,yep, with you. I think the first is the way to go actually, can make sure there's at least overlap of flowering season of different flowers and if there are gaps it won't look too cack.


Annuals will give you a longer flowering season, and you can play around more with them. I’ll bring the book up sometime.


I think the book I got is the same but with an added journal? I have plans for an entire cut flowers area The back garden will be mostly flowers. And a trampoline. And a swing seat because I've always wanted one

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9978

PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 18 7:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

You could do a mixture of the two. Why not borders that go from red through orange yellow green etc as you go along them. Looking from one end you would see the colours of the rainbow in order. Having them dotted around would be sensory overload if you didn't get it right. Jam Lady's advice is good, and particularly if you had the mixed up border.

Quite a lot of annuals will seed too, so although you would only plant them one year, they would continue for several. We keep getting old fashioned columbine popping up everwhere in our garden, and borage is another one that once you have it it is with you for years. At a distance borage also looks mauve btw. If you want some scent, pinks and stocks are good for that, and you can get some good colour in them too.

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8693
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 18 9:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

you want nice tough perennials, imho. and fill in the gaps with annuals

otherwise, as Sean says it will be buying in or raising huge quantities of bedding plants - plus a framework of permanent plants will give interest in the winter months too.
I am going to suggest hardy geraniums (not pelagoniums) - come in a variety of colours, come back year after year, and slugs don't eat them. ot scented but the leaves are slightly furry.

wellington womble



Joined: 08 Nov 2004
Posts: 14962
Location: East Midlands
PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 18 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I might organise my cut flowers like this. If I ever get round to planting any.

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