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axe handles needed
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dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33831
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 18 6:36 pm    Post subject: axe handles needed  Reply with quote    

are there any bespoke axe handle makers?

i need a long un and approx 20 "

the commercial stuff online and up close is not to spec.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6246
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 18 8:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

MoD surplus auctions?

Although the Green Goddesses and kit probably went a long time ago


Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 3989
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 18 5:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Try Carter Tools,Huddersfield?

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33831
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 18 9:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

umm i could get hands on with that option, ta .

i have had quite a few handles over the years and intend these two to work better and last longer than some.

both heads are smith made and deserve a decent stick.

wellington womble



Joined: 08 Nov 2004
Posts: 14947
Location: East Midlands
PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 18 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Could Gareth Riseborouh do you something? As in Sally and Gareth? I’m pretty sure her website is Sallypointer.co.uk and you can contact Gareth through it.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33831
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 18 10:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

the green wood worker thing is a possibility.

something i do want is for the grain to be part of the structure rather than chopping a handle shape out of a plank .

iirc a slice of buttress is about the correct shape in terms of grain lay

in a suitable wood makes it a bit harder and needing one felling length, even for a short bloke, is a bit trickier than a 20" for the GP axe head.

i have had the GP head through 4 handles and one major regrind, the felling axe is new to me and yet to be put back into full polish, it has not had a lot of use since it ended up in a shed somewhere probably as a kindling chopper on a broom handle

i guess research and outreach is needed

Rusticwood



Joined: 01 Dec 2009
Posts: 2123
Location: All over the South West
PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 18 9:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

If you want handles made for yourself rather than "of the shelf" it would be better
to go to a green woodworker. Not sure of any round you but these people might be able to help you find someone

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9728

PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 18 6:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I would agree a green woodworker. Ash would be a good wood and can be steam bent. Husband has just reminded me that Surrey and Sussex Coppice Group have a member that makes axe handles. You could try contact him through his web site; www.theluddite.com or e-mail him on ian@theluddite.com

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 3989
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 18 10:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

If you need a bend in the handle look for a natural bend,its stronger and gives more spring to the handle,

Coppiced off shoots at the base of the tree are the ones to look out for.

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33821
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 18 11:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

As an innocent, wood is traditionally used but are the new synthetic handles any good?

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5210
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 18 12:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I've broken as many (or more) fiberglass tool handles as I have wooden tool handles. Not to say that they can't be useful, I just don't know that they're as much more durable as you might think.

They don't dry out and come loose however. But they also may be difficult to replace/repair relative to wood.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33831
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 18 12:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

thanks folks, made to measure for the head and me seems essential to get the best out of the GP woodsman's one and i expect much the same with the big un.

i agree natural bend would be best, i want continuous grain full length if possible ie the centre of the heel has the same fibres as the centre of the neck and there is little chance of "plank splitting" due to short cross grain layers, the current issue with the GP axe..
ash is the most obvious choice for a uk made one but there are some rather good "exotic" timbers, hickory is the usual one but there are others even better than those. iirc some are "forest friendly" , some are not so much friendly as legal and a couple are on the banned trade list of rare primary forest timbers.

i will follow up the contacts list and see if i can find an artisan handle maker who is up for the job.

the little one needs a similar shape to the one on it (with a few minor adjustments to the heel and upper shaft ) and the big un i will just work out my best length
and let them shaft around that and the type of head.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33831
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 18 12:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

i just spoke to mrs axe , mr axe is teaching til monday when we can have a chat about sticks for the, almost, hudson's bay style one

the stuff in their online shop is pretty nice but this one was pretty good before the wear n tear
it's length, balance, shape, angles etc etc i rather like and i am used to it ( which is important ) i want it to be similar with a few improvements after refurbishment.

as they are woodsmithing tutors and specialist axe merchants it seems worth a chat

the kent pattern one is on hold for the mo but having used the GP one yesterday to make coppice cut stakes and withies it is well overdue a proper service.

probably best to get a proper axe cosy rather than an old coffee tin as well

i will report on progress

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6246
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 18 4:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nick wrote:
As an innocent, wood is traditionally used but are the new synthetic handles any good?


I've had splinters from a fibreglass handle..they go septic very quickly..and the handle wasn't good to use either

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33831
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 18 12:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nick wrote:
As an innocent, wood is traditionally used but are the new synthetic handles any good?


sorry missed that one , yes and no.

i would rather have a good synthetic handle than a poor wood one on a just about ok sort of tool.

i had a synthetic hammer for a couple of decades but i have gone back to an estwing again.
for a mid price strait long handle tool such as pick, big hammer ,splitting maul etc synthetic wins over wood most times .they last pretty well but often give no hint of impending catastrophic failure and afaik cannot be replaced

in axes good head and good wood is best, in hammers just get an estwing.

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