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SD's new house, the practical stuff
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dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33733
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 18 8:11 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

time passes things get done.

near end of internal first fix , into second fix/making good

it got a bit complicated as doing stuff showed up stuff that needed doing but i think we have run out of unexpected choices of surprise from an extensive but now known potential menu.

anyway engineering bricks, stainless steel and assorted setting chemical mixtures are my friends
almost all wires etc in place, half pipes in place, timber and plaster ongoing

not too bad considering winter(val)and the unknowns

i will do pictures of this stage.

juggling assorted diaries," desirability" and a budget is something that can be a bit tricky
notes to the bold:
if you have not done this sort of thing before make sure you pay a lot of attention to all three factors and keep an open mind regarding how to solve practical or administrative problems

a combo of decay, bomb damage, some top quality historic mistakes and what could kindly be described as despicable acts here and there is interesting to identify and remedy. most of that is sorted with just a few bits to still do

the new layout is ace and will work very well for most households,

at the mo i am wondering how to stretch the budget to a month or so of a willing/capable minion to get them moved in( if not finished) within an 8wk window.
a combo of " barnraising" and "we want to do some of it " covers some stuff but there are plenty of things a minion and me can do that they cant and subbying in costs too much. i will work on that thought

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9637

PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 18 9:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Remembering our first house, built about 1870, the failures started with the build. They didn't understand damp courses and fire walls and it got worse from there. Swear some of the internal walls were built after a visit to the pub they were so curved.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33733
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 18 9:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

bathroom ready for plastering, with a floor, a new ceiling (under the old split level and saggy one) and wires and pipes and stuff.
that means once the spreading is done the plumbing tails can be raised, mist coat to the walls/ceiling and then a proper waterproof floor can be laid ready for all the nice shiny bits of bathroom and boiler
other rooms are available for plastering but there is still a lot of smallish ( and a couple of largish ) tasks to do before the last thing is ready for skimming .

most of the electrics are done and there are only a few bits of in the voids plumbing to do.

i'm playing with sticks next to create a few wall surfaces and sort out the downstairs wood floors for something to stand on and make sure these ones stay dry and well ventilated unlike the ones they are replacing

it still looks messy unless you remember the cm of dust in the kitchen ( sitting on several cubic meters of rubble )

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5188
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 18 11:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Do you waterproof with a paint on membrane, similar to "redguard" here in the U.S.?

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33733
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 18 6:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

not me .

imho good plaster, well planned ventilation and heating helps a lot
in the uk climate let it breathe is often the best bet regarding damp in bathrooms although oil based eggshell paint can be handy if condensation is inevitable(un heatable walls etc)

i do back high water areas with waterproof board*, marine ply as a substrate for tiles or polymer is ace.
the floor will be sealed vinyl so as any floods go down the stairs and avoid the electrics and kitchen (i have seen too many oopsies that start in a bathroom)

* given chance i will line the entire bathroom in marine ply or waterproof mdf and then tile it

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33733
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Feb 23, 18 3:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

we are well into second fix, juggling trade's diaries and mission timings is the game at this stage.

before, after, before, at the same time, week after next, etc, etc

i need a second fix

it will work out but this stage is probably the most complex.
the budget and financing are issues that impact on timings and timings do on them, again complex but under control.
my 20 to 30 is still covering the infrastructure stuff (at the top end , so what, tis still a goer from start to sell if needs be although that is not in the plan, this is a home ) but i cant dis getting a stunning cooker although that did not feature in my cost projection

bring a house back into use for a generation or two might be "greener" than building an "ecohome" in some circumstances.
apart from efficient equipment and a lot of loft insulation it isnt a "green" project but it is better to mend it than get a new one most of the time

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6005
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Mon Feb 26, 18 11:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I've been following this thread and I know you're a busy, busy man DPack but not one single photo yet? I'm very disappointed to say the least

Shan



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 7475
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Mon Feb 26, 18 1:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Ditto!!!

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33733
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 18 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

OK once i feel a bit better i will sort out a few choice snaps

Shan



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 7475
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 18 3:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Super! Hope you feel better soon.

Lloyd



Joined: 24 Jan 2005
Posts: 2699

PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 18 7:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

C'mon mate, waiting for a pic

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33733
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri May 04, 18 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

plenty is done
some stuff is part done

once most of it was drying out the other issue became clear and has been sorted by mending the drain gully and fitting channel drains to stop a lot of water getting in

at last they decided that the kitchen floor was beyond saving
the last few days of digging and filling has been heavy work but as a bonus i have a 25mm dry riser for a new water feed in which is good as the lead pipe with a dead leg is functional but far less than ideal


the original tiled floor in the hallway should be ok as it has had a fair bit of "stabilisation" . doing the conservation stuff under a floor that could be replaced for a few K is a matter of taste, mine , the material are cheap but the labour is not.
once it gets a decent acid peel and a nice wipe with some makeup it will be very pretty and quite a architectural rarity as most get skipped due to the condition of em.

as far as i can see once the concrete is in, tomorrow uggghhhh, i recon we are out of first fix in every department.
most of second fix is carpentry with a bit of plastering and the 3rd fix stuff to get it to fit to move into and re-mortgageable is significant but quick and relatively cheap

35 cu meters out , 15 metric tons in at a very rough guess by the end of the refurb:roll:

the number of little and larger issues caused by bad historic decisions in a job like this makes me think that getting one that is very messy and getting back to basics rather than trusting the last hundred years or so of "improvements" is a good strategy
for instance i would not consider a new or second hand house without a full rewire or thorough eyeball from a trusted spark
gas can have issues, just blank the meter and re pipe
etc etc etc

i will do photos and a proper write up when it is done.

sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 41850
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Mon May 07, 18 6:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:


the number of little and larger issues caused by bad historic decisions in a job like this makes me think that getting one that is very messy and getting back to basics rather than trusting the last hundred years or so of "improvements" is a good strategy
.


We were the third owners of our 1912 house in Motspur Park, buying it from the lady who'd bought it in 1927. It had had central heating installed and some secondary glazing. Was a dream to sort out, rewire, new boiler, new kitchen and a towel rail.

This one in Devon has been hacked about by a string of morons over the years. We're going to have to spend some serious dosh in the next couple of years sorting it.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33733
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon May 07, 18 8:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

ummm, tis rather like that sometimes.

the structural part of the slab is 100/125 mm thick in 2 ballast/2 grit/1 ordinary with a bit of waterproofer laid on visqueen over lots of compacted hardcore, gravel and sand and i have a 25mm dry riser in mains water pipe routed under it

the screed needs an undetermined but significant amount of volume, it would be rather fun to do it in 1/4 inch to dust shiny granite and snowcem with a power float finish
if the price differential is not too horrid i might surprise em just for fun

spose what might get spent on concrete now gets saved on less permanent flooring over a lifetime, not my lifetime but i can see them having their grandkids round

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33733
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue May 08, 18 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

fancy concrete is too expensive so more half ballast half sharp sand to fill 75 mm or so and then topped with lots of sharp sand and float work lying on a ladder

the surface profile is a tad challenging as the 1970's extension floor slab is about 30 mm higher than the lower part of the hallway tiles which are charming but have a rather concave and now stabilised shape
i need to decide on the best way to connect the fixed points and shapes, mostly flat and level is good for a kitchen

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