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Folks, A trick I learned for growing green onions/scallions
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dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34203
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 18 8:38 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

the conversation i had with bill and gary ( in NYC ) when i was asking for suitable containers to mix pimms was quite amusing.

"can i borrow your jugs?" was rather confusing for 2 gay guys and then i remembered that a pitcher is not just somebody chatting to a commissioning editor

jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 26620
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 18 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

and just don't ask for a fag

Shan



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 7573
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 18 9:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I've always viewed 'spring onion' and 'scallion' as being interchangeable terms but then I was born in SA.

billfromlachine



Joined: 08 Jul 2018
Posts: 26
Location: Montreal Canada
PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 18 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Shan,

What we call scallions/green onions in North America do not make bulbs and are grown primarily for their green tops. It's also much used in Chinese cooking the chop in up and put in raw in soups or add to stir fries, etc....

Unless I'm mistaken spring onions in the UK are imature onions with small bulbs, someone correct me if I'm wrong.

Here's a short video explaning scallions/green onions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dSeKPGGZG4o

Regards + HH

Bill



Shan wrote:
I've always viewed 'spring onion' and 'scallion' as being interchangeable terms but then I was born in SA.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9978

PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 18 6:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Bill, looking them up, scallions and spring onions are not the same, but generally spring onions and the large ones we harvest in autumn aren't either I don't think. Large onions can be used as spring onions, but think they are slightly different usually.

pollyanna



Joined: 03 Nov 2012
Posts: 221

PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 18 2:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

In the South Wales valleys they were called gibbons; but I haven't heard them called thus since my childhood.

billfromlachine



Joined: 08 Jul 2018
Posts: 26
Location: Montreal Canada
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 18 5:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

pollyanna,

I checked and it appears gibbons or jibbons is a term for them predominently in Wales.

Here's some more info to mull over....lol.

https://ca.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20061109085024AArrxoN


pollyanna wrote:
In the South Wales valleys they were called gibbons; but I haven't heard them called thus since my childhood.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5265
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 18 8:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Bill do you get into eating any ramps in the spring?
They don't have the species in the U.K. (to my knowledge) but they do have ramsons which are also a wild allium.

(Just thought I'd throw out some more confusing allium names for people to mull over)

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34203
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 18 9:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

three cornered leek, a small allium which (as you guessed ) a triangular stem. quite tasy

just for fun garlic mustard (which is not an allium but one of the brassicas ) and also called jack by the hedge is a bit strong but a little is ok in a mixed salad or minor potherb

billfromlachine



Joined: 08 Jul 2018
Posts: 26
Location: Montreal Canada
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 18 9:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Slim,

We do have wild garlic or ramps growing where I live. Since the wild ones have been overharvested by people were restricted to harvest 25 bulbs max, which certainly isnt much to last the year.

My dental hygienist has a patch growing in her garden so maybe if I suck up to her she will give me some to replant in my garden. Just have to bring her some home made preserves as barter medium.

Her father gave her some which he picked in the country to start the patch so it keeps expanding.

Here is a video of someone harvesting them in Ohio.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nptiaHxTr0I

Regards

Bill

Slim wrote:
Bill do you get into eating any ramps in the spring?
They don't have the species in the U.K. (to my knowledge) but they do have ramsons which are also a wild allium.

(Just thought I'd throw out some more confusing allium names for people to mull over)

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5265
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 18 9:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It's a long process, but you can gather seeds (well, you can here, check your own Canadian rules first!)

If you get them into some good ground with leaf litter by the fall you may see the tiny seedlings next spring - but they won't be worth harvesting for years!

billfromlachine



Joined: 08 Jul 2018
Posts: 26
Location: Montreal Canada
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 18 11:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Slim,

Yep Ill definitely go with an established clump in a barter exchange rather than waiting many years for the first harvest.

Regards

Bill

Slim wrote:
It's a long process, but you can gather seeds (well, you can here, check your own Canadian rules first!)

If you get them into some good ground with leaf litter by the fall you may see the tiny seedlings next spring - but they won't be worth harvesting for years!

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9978

PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 18 7:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Your ramps are rather different from our wild garlic. For a start, wild garlic leaves are used rather than the bulbs. We have lots of it in the woods, and have found the only way to control it is by letting the light in, although it comes back when the canopy closes again. Our wild garlic has very tiny bulbs, so not really worth eating. The flowers are also used by some people in a salad.

Shan



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 7573
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 18 7:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Flowers are also rather nice sprinkled on top of a soup.

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 4007
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 18 9:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

pollyanna wrote:
In the South Wales valleys they were called gibbons; but I haven't heard them called thus since my childhood.


In the Welsh speaking parts of the South Wales valley`s your Gibbons are called Shibwns,

My Granny,my Mothers Mother from Hereford called them Gibbons.

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