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Government legislation on burning 'wet' wood
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Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 11800

PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 20 8:29 am    Post subject: Government legislation on burning 'wet' wood  Reply with quote    

From next year the government are proposing to ban the sale of what it calls 'wet' wood. I have written about this before, but it seems they are going ahead with it.

In spite of scientific evidence that wood and coal smoke accounts for no more than 9% of PM 2.5 particulates in towns and cities and 3-6% in the country, the government is still bandying about a figure of over 30% caused by it. This is the current blame for everything pollutant from heart disease to depression.

As far as most people are concerned, this will mean that the price of firewood will rise significantly as smaller producers have to register, provide adequate storage and paperwork to go with each load. It will also, in the proposed legislation mean that the purchaser has to be there to be shown that loose wood is under 20% moisture content. You will not be able to buy less than 2 cu m of wood that is not fully seasoned. It may also be extremely difficult to buy log sacks as most small suppliers will similarly have to register and prove dry storage and seasoned wood.

The result is likely to be that most firewood comes sealed in plastic, probably supplied by people like CPL and other petrol and diesel suppliers (CPL is Certas Petroleum Limited) or imported; a bonanza for the big boys again. Another result is likely to be that woodland gets managed less as there will be a limited market for thinnings, wood produced by general management etc. Tree surgery work could also rise in price because the results cannot be sold as firewood, but will have to go to landfill.

A knock on effect will be that country workers who get a significant part of their income from firewood will have to either find other sources of income or be unemployed.

Sorry about the rant but we are probably going to have to rebuild our business, we know the data the government are using is rubbish, and it will affect lots of people who want or even need to have a wood or coal fire, including the most vulnerable.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6865
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 20 9:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Crazy...we always bought wood a year or so in advance.
I don't see the point in using fuel to dry fuel

It's the nanny state not trusting the consumers and putting the capital outlay on the producers. Apart from anything else.
We are supposed to conform.....

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6865
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 20 9:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hopefully it won't affect potters who fire with wood, using sawmill leftovers

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6690
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 20 9:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I'm sorry to hear this MR. Of course the government are using wrong figures, they always do and of course big business is going to benefit, that way the government benefits.

I have words for governments but this is a family friendly forum so I'll refrain from posting them.

I hope you manage to get it sorted without too much cost to yourselves.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5685
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 20 10:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That's pretty silly. I'm guessing the only argument for it is the difficulty in addressing the real issue which is the people who are burning wet wood, so the plan is to make sure they can't access wet wood.

Will you need to build new storage? Apart from registering, what changes will you have to make to your operation?

I'm also in a humid climate, but folks season their wood outdoors here more often than not. Will they make you build a covered drying area, even if you can show that your final product is below 20% moisture?

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6865
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 20 10:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Just read the article about this, apparently those buying wood in 2m3 at least won't be affected...
Also explains why our local coal merchant has just changed his delivery lorry to a covered one

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 4325
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 20 11:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

https://www.cpldistribution.co.uk/

In South Wales its a washery based at Onllwyn,handling,washing and packing coal from one underground mine and a few opencasts.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 37370
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 20 4:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

perhaps you are mistaking government and evidence based policy or even using nudge technique

if you want folk to avoid burning wet wood educate them as to the advantages of dry wood and human nature +the market will ensure wood is dry.

the cause of most micro particulates is being greenwashed rather viciously in this case.

RichardW



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 8442
Location: Llyn Peninsular North Wales
PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 20 5:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

gz wrote:
Hopefully it won't affect potters who fire with wood, using sawmill leftovers


Why would it?

The ban is on the sale of firewood over 20% not the burning of it.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6865
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 20 6:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Should be ok,as sawmills seem to want rid of it!

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 11800

PostPosted: Sat Feb 22, 20 8:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The stuff that come directly from sawmills may be green or seasoned, depending on what they cut. There is no restriction on burning green wood, apart from the possible problem of neighbours complaining to local health people.

We will have to see how it goes, but it will depend on the precise wording and also may affect our outlets for log sacks, if they put in the regulations they were proposing. To manage this we would have to register (several hundred pounds) plus about £100 a year plus find covered storage, plus buy a moisture meter which would have to be calibrated at least every year. We would not be allowed to sell less than 2 cu m for people to season themselves, and as some like to buy 1 cu m in summer and season for winter, it would affect them. Our outlets may also need to register, and they are hardly going to want to both pay to register and prove they have dry storage, so be prepared for plastic bagged logs only available if you want a lot sack.

It appears that the government data did not get vetted by the Office of National Statistics, so the National Statistician, may be nailing someones tie to their desk and having a rant at them at some point. I do hope so.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 37370
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Feb 22, 20 3:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

"we dont need experts"

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 4325
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Sat Feb 22, 20 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I dare say you have seen this consultation paper Chris,but if not ,here it is,luckily the boy`s still working in the Collieries in the Forest of Dean have managed to get an exemption for their coal.

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/air-quality-using-cleaner-fuels-for-domestic-burning/outcome/summary-of-responses-and-government-response#coal-1

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 37370
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Feb 22, 20 10:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

knowing what we know is that a good thing?

swapping life down a smelly hole for say a breezy forest to make a living with an energy harvest of managed tree wood might appeal to folk with wet boots, a stoop and a fear of tommyknockers(or what ever the local evil mine sprites are called)
similar rules apply regarding procedures and safety so they have transferable skills

happen tis a heritage industry but unless it is a material rather than a fuel leave it in momma

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 11800

PostPosted: Sun Feb 23, 20 9:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yes, thanks Ty Gwyn, I have read that. I am pretty sure a couple of the quotes in it are the ones I put in too. It seems that there are some people who want to get rid of wood burning all together, and they may have a more powerful voice. It seems Small Woods are not exactly being helpful, but I have asked to join their group and will be asking them what their 'simple technology' to dry wood is as they think everyone should be able to get wood down to 20% moisture content.

Currently fuming as it will mean unless there is an ethical and legal way round the actual legislation when it is detailed, we may have to give up firewood and try to make a living on other things such as charcoal, crafts, hedgelaying and fencing. Sadly, so will a lot of other people.

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