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sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6989
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Wed Apr 07, 21 7:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

It's all looking great Jema.

What is the heat like in there in the summer?

jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 27150
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Thu Apr 08, 21 6:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

sgt.colon wrote:
It's all looking great Jema.

What is the heat like in there in the summer?


Well that will be the question. It still has a few holes needing sorting. I don't think it will ever be a very hot greenhouse as it's very high as these things go. But it does not need to be that hot.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 39855
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 21 11:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

i have no idea which way up anyone's decking is, allegedly the grooves should go downside to increase drip, air flow and extend the useful life

not topside and the grooves are for grip.

umm

citations needed considering where i saw that but in some ways it does almost seem reasonable

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 39855
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 21 11:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

that was new to me, i always thought groovie=grip rather than drip dry

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 39855
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 21 11:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

dont worry about it, tis a consideration for any new works

at the mo i am considering using the structures of shed and wood shed with a saw, screws and polycarbonate to give in the sun out of the rain rather than a shed full of carp and no sunny place

jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 27150
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Wed Apr 14, 21 6:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Bit late for the groove debate. Some of the stuff we reclaimed is without grooves on one side and I can see the logic that plain side up makes some sense.

We finally got more timber yesterday afternoon, so may be able to add a bit more structure. Did use up some more old decking for shelving.




Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 12845

PostPosted: Wed Apr 14, 21 7:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I assume that the post was being held up by the tree but the fence gave up the idea.

jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 27150
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Wed Apr 14, 21 7:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Oddly enough, no, that one was hanging on by a rotten thread and propped up by a perpendicular fence on the rotting deck. We have a row of fallen fencing to deal with, but it's not easy. These are no ordinary fencing panels but seriously heavy timber.
I'd never have put fences on a subsiding precipice in the first place, but if I did I'm not sure heavy and holeless would have been my choice. Seems a way to catch all the wind and create leverage at the base.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 12845

PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 21 7:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

A lot of fences are. The larch lap ones are frequently the first to go. We put a wire mesh fence in between us and next door as we thought that would be better in our fairly windy position. It breaks up the wind nicely and the hedge has just grown round it. If you want a solid fence there, British hazel hurdles attached to chestnut posts might be a good solution. Keep the hurdles off the ground and stop stuff growing through them for longest lasting results. Otherwise a trellis type or continuous woven hazel might work quite well too.

jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 27150
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 21 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Mistress Rose wrote:
A lot of fences are. The larch lap ones are frequently the first to go. We put a wire mesh fence in between us and next door as we thought that would be better in our fairly windy position. It breaks up the wind nicely and the hedge has just grown round it. If you want a solid fence there, British hazel hurdles attached to chestnut posts might be a good solution. Keep the hurdles off the ground and stop stuff growing through them for longest lasting results. Otherwise a trellis type or continuous woven hazel might work quite well too.


My attitude is why have a fence at all? Well apart from the cows which have returned for the first time this year today.
Growing an organic barrier seems far more sensible and inside of that we will be fenced off.

Working for the Clampdown



Where the gate will go.



Today's mostly been clearing crap, someones threatened to visit soon, and it would be nice not to be a total building site, that aspect I somehow forget to photo!

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 39855
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 21 3:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    



i am at the start again or upcycle planning stage, at least i have made space for a big pile of carp that can be taken away from in the two sheds and indoors

a 1980s printer and a 60's projector are not the most redundant things:roll:

one small shed and outdoor space or convert the bigger shed to greenhouse/outside room?

at the mo i am minded to one small, solid shed and no rats

jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 27150
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 21 6:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Rats was one of the reasons for going metal when we demolished two sheds. It is nice to see that some of the demolished bits have found a home in the new structure.

Can't comment on your choices without photos. we get called a shanty town because of all my structures, three green houses, two summer houses, two sheds and the "bus stop" plus a sort of conservatory and garage.

But that does leave a lot of outdoor space.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 12845

PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 21 7:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

But I expect the people who call it a shanty town are only too pleased to have produce from one of the 'shanties'. From your pictures, you seem to have done a lot with a rather unpromising site.

jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 27150
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 21 2:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    



I like it. Hides the flats on the other side of the marsh. So we have two totally secluded gardens. One is slightly shady in the afternoon the other a sun trap.

When we moved here it was the bottom summer house where it is now and the decaying marsh deck and just lawn sloping down, oh and a decaying shed facing the summer house (nice choice of view guys) that had developed a distinct tilt as it was at the precipice along with the fence. I recall I think that by some miracle the fence was not yet sagging.
We had a competition at the housewarming party inviting people to sketch what might be done, there were no entries not least from us and it took a long time to start to carve things out, practically inverting the layout.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 39855
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 21 5:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

, if that recent addition is fairly strong it helps a lot with wind as well as hiding a less good view(if i sort of understand the weather and landscape shapes involved)

this stuff has to be holistic to work well

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