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dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 45214
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Nov 11, 23 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

birdtown news

the fly past was educational

grin and wing grin in tight formation at about 500ft, under a very clear sunny blue sky

they were seen by the tv ariel lookout, everyone went into low level confusion and escape mode,

the grins knew they were rumbled and kept a straight course

conclusion, there is a lot of awareness in birdtown

the grins may have had afternoon tea and been going home to the minster
they have been seen using 500ft and unaware snacks in these circumstances

clear sky is dangeroos in this habitat, they hunt out of the sun when they mean it, this time they were going into town and only a little interested in the panic below, although they would have taken an opportunity if they could

the locals need to learn from scruffy's orphaning and keep lookouts in rotation while they do birdy stuff without a care

having been only a little below a grin swoop noticing them at a distance is best

ms sammison still with us, roland is an innocent, feels no threat from metal and likes meat
give it a few days and ms sammison will be safer

Last edited by dpack on Mon Nov 20, 23 1:53 pm; edited 1 time in total

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 45214
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 23 1:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

ok..... i will start with weird, it is the 20th nov in yorkshire and its daylight

slugtown news, the leopard slugs have been active at night and a few expire of natural causes

a small black slug was active just now

now it gets yucky and or very creepy

a leopard slug expired the night before last and as it is damp the carcase has been gently decaying

small black slug homed in on it from at least a couple of meters away, enthusiastically quickly for a small slug

it explored the carrion, adjusted its position and (turn away now if you are easily upset ) either started eating it or trying cross species necrophilia

at the mo i not sure i want another look

too much of a cliffhanger not to gather more observations, some things are a bit much even for me

back soon

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 45214
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 23 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

that was something of a comfort

big dead slug getting smaller, small black slug getting bigger

the November and daylight things are still weird

at least both sorts are relatively harmless to plants, leopards like "compost" and black uns like carrion and possibly hunt going by the speed of that one

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 45214
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Nov 23, 23 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

birdtown news, dik is becoming a regular and hunting small critters at least twice a week

scruffy is not scruffy any more, very hansom bird, fully feathered in a fine suit

the ugly duckling story might have a basis in critter lore and not just domestic+wild fowl confusion
as a just fledged scruffy was an ugly wee thing, especially to better looking pigeons

if george formby had been watching windows rather that cleaning them, there might have been a verse about late november pigeon porn
optomistic, but considering the weather it is probably a good risk(and they know they have food)

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 15449

PostPosted: Fri Nov 24, 23 7:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Squabs are particularly horrible looking specimens of bird life, but if you like pigeons, once they are fledged, some are particularly beautiful. Glad Dik is visiting regularly. A robin landed on the handle of DILs mobility scooter yesterday while she was sat on it, but of course flew away before son could get a picture.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 45214
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Nov 25, 23 4:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

a nice series

young naturalist

a couple of points, well several, his "white hart" looks like a youngish white stag with rather nice antlers, which explains it being alone until it gets to take its own hind herd, if it can

albinotic deer are fairly rare, i have only seen one, a white hind (with its 8 brown herd mates)
during a fair bit of time outside in deer filled places, i must have seen thousands of assorted melanotic deer to the one white one
lucky youngster to see one, even if they look a lot of folk never see

i was rather in awe of the thing, a memorable wildlife encounter
it will probably be the only one the youngster meets, in over 6 decades quite a bit of which has been outside and aware, i recon i am very lucky to have met one for 20 mins or so at maybe 50 meters while they had a late dawn nibble and slipped back into the woods

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 15449

PostPosted: Sun Nov 26, 23 8:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

We have just spent a week in Cornwall, and it was very interesting to visit some of the gardens, both inside and outside. Trellissick on the Fal estuary had primroses, a few azaleas, camellia and the odd rhododendron in flower, although as everywhere the leaves are coming off the trees in general. I have seen primroses in flower in late autumn, so not sure if these are early spring flowering, late autumn, or just plain confused.

Heligan didn't have much in the way of flowers, apart from one garden that I think has a lot of sun and is out of the wind and is enclosed in walls, so seems to manage very late in the year. They seem to be less frost and cold wind prone than we are though.

At the Eden Project the roal roal partridge in the tropical biodome were rather lovely. There were signs up asking people to leave them alone and not to pick them up, but the birds can't read, so seemed to be round people all the time. They are not the least frightened of humans and tend to gather round every time you stop. Otherwise they are turning over leaves looking for insects (although they don't seem adverse to crumbs). DIL managed to get a short video of some buzzards using the thermals from the sides of the quanrry for lift, and we saw one being chased off by a seagull and some rooks.

On the way home we stopped at Exeter services and as I went down through the car park I came face to face with a young seagull looking me in the eye from the top of a parked car. On the way back it seemed to have settled down nicely on the car so hope it didn't leave its calling card for them.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 45214
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 23 8:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

it is coldish, adding a bit of warm to the bird water is polite in such weather

it might seem odd, but dehydration is more of a problem in cold than it is in drought

the justinson tribe still number about 17, not too bad considering they were down to 5 after the event
the nco tribe number about the same

if half of them survive winter there is a good chance the numbers will be similar to pre event by mid-summer

other species are not present or very rare compared to pre event

observing an extinction level event and its aftermath is fascinating and horrifying even at a small localish scale
the big obvious things like bird species are significant markers, the changes in the mini beasts and flora is probably more important long term

the local species tally before and after is as dramatic as the KT boundary, and with a different sort of event and location the evidence would enter the geo-palaeontological record
as it is a "rotting" environment and event rather than "depositing" one words will have to record it

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 45214
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 23 12:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

at the mo a bluetit is doing its best to use a feeder without sparrows getting too upset and angry
i will add extra sunflower seeds to the mix and order mealworms

the blue is not a regular, although it is almost local

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 45214
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 23 1:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

grabbing two pigeons who were locked beaks in a dispute over food was funny, they were told off proper victorian school maam style

they have decided to carry on now i am inside

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 45214
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 23 2:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

i did tell them i would grab them if they carried on, they ignored me, pretty good double catch for an old crip

grab "behave yerselves" release,

this might be why grandparents should learn useful skills when they are young

if i needed a "loft" with "messengers" to deposit wherever and rely on them returning, i recon a couple of hours catching and then a month of solid geolocating would provide a decent core flock

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 45214
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 23 3:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

they do like me and me them, i am in charge

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 45214
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 23 3:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

that was fun, sort of

i ambled into the yard to sit on my bucket, grin looked at me from 6 ft away on top of the shed

it is clear and the sun is low from the west, classic conditions for grin to work this hunting patch

ambush from the shed top is a very different tactic to try

i left enough bramble to give escape cover for the sparrows , the ones here at the time found it rather scary, although grin had decided it was a "miss" to be where it was before they saw it

the daw flock has just returned, about 30 of them,i guess they were spooked by it

bootiful birds, if a bit beak and talon for some

a grin nest up a cliff near me was nice, ground level interactions are awesome


dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 45214
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 23 4:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

2 close encounters in one afternoon is such a privilege it surprises me

even though i am an omnivore and do person stuff wildlife does seem to treat me like one of them rather than the way they react to most humans

a close look at grin's waistcoat was very special, im not too sure about their personalities being "nice" having done eye contact, grin might feel the same about me

as wildlife encounters go, it is up there with a bacon butty badger in the basha or me slithering into a red deer herd and saying hello

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 15449

PostPosted: Thu Nov 30, 23 8:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Wildlife can sometimes be very tolerant of people. Husband had a pair of hares running round him in the woods completely oblivious to his presence, wood mice don't seem to be aware of us, robins regard us as a good food source and it is possible to get quite close to deer by careful stalking.

Nice to get so close to your birds Dpack, especially the peregrine. The pigeons seem to have ignored your warning though.

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