Home Page
   Articles
       links
About Us    
Traders        
Recipes            
Latest Articles
Chalk
Page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Grow Your Own
Author 
 Message
Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Thu Apr 13, 06 6:36 pm    Post subject: Chalk  Reply with quote    

No, not a complaint about our garden again but a question on it's usefulness.

Do people use crushed chalk in the garden at all? Will it change the pH of the soil to a similar, if less effective way, as lime? I remember my father adding crushed chalk to home made potting compost.

If it can be used I wonder if anyone would be interested in it as I have to extract several skip loads of virgin chalk from our garden. Obvioulsy it can't be posted but I could bung the on sack of the stuff in the car if I ever met someone.

cab



Joined: 01 Nov 2004
Posts: 32429

PostPosted: Thu Apr 13, 06 6:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

From what I've read, chalk can be powdered and used like lime.

What are you doing back there that'll involve shifting so much chalk?

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 06 8:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I need to dig out an off road parking area which is essential because we live near a station.

No other ideas? I'm sure if we move to an area that has acid soil we'll end up needing the stuff.

Lozzie



Joined: 25 May 2005
Posts: 2595

PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 06 8:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

This is going to sound riddiculous and totally useless to you but ... (when has that ever stopped me?) every year the children at Cerne Abbas Primary school help re-chalk the outline of the Giant of Cerne Abbas. I wonder if they need any chalk?

Do you have any chalk hill carvings near where you live, O Treacly-One?

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 06 8:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I don't think we do, although I could be tempted to carve a phallic man on my neighbours lawn moss killed lawn.

Lozzie



Joined: 25 May 2005
Posts: 2595

PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 06 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    



Go for it, I say. A bit of artistic vandalism, like guerrilla gardening!

Joey



Joined: 03 Nov 2004
Posts: 191

PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 06 8:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Chalk, limestone, marble.
All are more or less Calcium carbonate.

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 06 11:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Joey wrote:
Chalk, limestone, marble.
All are more or less Calcium carbonate.


Yes but I would assume chalk breaks down slower than agricultural lime? So for an equall amount it would be less effective at reducing the acidity of the soil but it would last longer?

If anyone wants a bag or two and we get round to meeting up at a downsizer meet this year then shout!

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 08 12:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yesterday I noticed some arable fields had a fair bit of crushed chalk spread over them, and the path and roads, so it looks like it is used. I wonder if there's any way of contacting local horticultural societies as I'm digging out a huge amount of the stuff from the back garden this time. Anyone want a few sacks, or a skip load...

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 08 1:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Treacodactyl wrote:
Joey wrote:
Chalk, limestone, marble.
All are more or less Calcium carbonate.


Yes but I would assume chalk breaks down slower than agricultural lime? So for an equall amount it would be less effective at reducing the acidity of the soil but it would last longer?


Yes & yes, slow release it not always a bad thing though, but it'll depend how much flint there is in with the chalk. It's most effective left on the surface before the first frosts & it'll soon get crushed with no effort.

If anyone wants rid of some round here we could make use of a few hundred tonnes.

dougal



Joined: 15 Jan 2005
Posts: 7184
Location: South Kent
PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 08 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

One of the more unusual and interesting uses for chalk is as a building material.

It can be rammed, between metal formers, to produce bloody strong (and very eco) walls.

http://www.pinescalyxproject.co.uk/

Horticulturally, its much gentler and slower than lime, so it also has a soil texture effect (like pebbles) for much, much longer...

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 08 1:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Rob R wrote:
If anyone wants rid of some round here we could make use of a few hundred tonnes.


Well, if you have a word with Nick...

When the front was done they took about three lorry loads out, big 14 wheel lorries. It does contain flints though, in layers every 50cm or so (anyone want any flints? ). It's easy enough to supply sacks of it without flint for garden use.

If only I could store it, I bet when we move it would come in very handy.

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 08 1:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dougal wrote:
One of the more unusual and interesting uses for chalk is as a building material.

It can be rammed, between metal formers, to produce bloody strong (and very eco) walls.


Interesting, but how do you stop the weather from braking down the walls?

dougal



Joined: 15 Jan 2005
Posts: 7184
Location: South Kent
PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 08 6:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Treacodactyl wrote:
dougal wrote:
One of the more unusual and interesting uses for chalk is as a building material.

It can be rammed, between metal formers, to produce bloody strong (and very eco) walls.


Interesting, but how do you stop the weather from braking down the walls?

Lime render on the exterior surfaces?
IIRC the interior walls were to given some sort of coating to stabilise dust yet not conceal the chalk. (The Calyx wasn't completely finished when I last visited.)
Google has more info eg http://www.rammed-earth.info/project/33/

vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21298
Location: Ynys Môn
PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 08 6:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Treacodactyl wrote:
dougal wrote:
One of the more unusual and interesting uses for chalk is as a building material.

It can be rammed, between metal formers, to produce bloody strong (and very eco) walls.


Interesting, but how do you stop the weather from braking down the walls?


Limewash is very good but needs refreshing every year or two.

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Grow Your Own All times are GMT
Page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2
View Latest Posts View Latest Posts

 

Archive
Powered by php-BB © 2001, 2005 php-BB Group
Style by marsjupiter.com, released under GNU (GNU/GPL) license.
Copyright © 2004 marsjupiter.com