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Back garden hedge laying
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alison
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Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 12908
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 05 8:32 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

You still see a fair amount of hedging around here, but I suppose we do have a lot of livestock in this area, compared to arable farming.

Gertie



Joined: 08 Jan 2005
Posts: 1638
Location: Yorkshire
PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 05 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Treacodactyl - where did you find out where to do this, shown by someone or read up on it?

Treacodactyl
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Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 05 6:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Both! I've seen it done at a couple of country fairs, on TV and it's in a couple of books and Country Smallholding.

The hedge was too small really, but it has worked and filled up nicely. I cut through about 50-70% of the stem and bent the small branches over.

That's one thing I will defiantly do when I get somewhere is to gradually renovate the hedges by layering and also plant more if required.

Guest






PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 05 7:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I'm doing a day's hedge laying course on Saturday!! Its something that has always fascinated me and our hedges are disgusting. If I can just get the basic idea I will them have a go - working on the assumption that if its my hedges I make a mess of it doesn't matter!

I'm sure there are similar courses all over the country. I found mine in a local free magazine.

Treacodactyl
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 05 7:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It seems quite popular, you often find small parts round here where people have been shown the art.

Make sure you have good gloves and I'd recommend eye protection.

Guest






PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 05 9:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thanks for that advice. Have strong gloves and will specs do?!!!!!

Treacodactyl
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 05 10:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I wear specs but a pesky pond plant got me a couple of years back and I still notice it. I would have a pair of the cheap goggles handy, especially as the best hedge laying plants often have spikes (hawthorn, blackthorn etc...)

Lloyd



Joined: 24 Jan 2005
Posts: 2699

PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 05 11:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I have a Hawthorn around my garden and would like to do the same. What time of year is best to do this, mate?

Treacodactyl
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 05 7:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

'In the Winter months'. If you have much hedge to lay I'd at least find someone local who's done it to either help you or give some advice.

Gertie



Joined: 08 Jan 2005
Posts: 1638
Location: Yorkshire
PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 05 7:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

My dad used to do the hedges on the farm.

It's great to see that some of the old skills used by our forefathers are making a comeback.

I've got his old books in the loft so this weekend might have a look at them. If I find anything interesting I'll let you know.

Treacodactyl
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Joined: 28 Oct 2004
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 05 7:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Gertie wrote:
My dad used to do the hedges on the farm.

It's great to see that some of the old skills used by our forefathers are making a comeback.

I've got his old books in the loft so this weekend might have a look at them. If I find anything interesting I'll let you know.


Any info or book recommendations welcome. Probably out of print but could be worth looking out for.

Gertie



Joined: 08 Jan 2005
Posts: 1638
Location: Yorkshire
PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 05 7:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I think these would be out of print (there are definitely 3 hard-backed huge books which my dad would have had after 2nd world war - it makes interesting reading as they are all about old methods of raising livestock, farming techniques (ploughing with horses and new(!) Massey F tractors- I would glady arrange to have anything of interest scanned, e-mailed or mailed out to you - no problem.

Lloyd



Joined: 24 Jan 2005
Posts: 2699

PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 05 9:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thanks, Gertie. The problem is, it would ALL be of interest to me!...I have an old set of encyclopedias on Equine veterinary ailments and anatomy which is pre war if anyone wants to make me an offer I can't refuse.

Treacodactyl
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 05 10:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Same here, one of the reasons I know a little about many things is that we tend to collect books and read about all sorts of things.

martin



Joined: 15 Apr 2005
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Fri Apr 15, 05 9:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The BTCV have made their 125 page book on hedging available on-line here. (You can also buy it for 13.95 if you prefer.)

In all there are ten books available: Dry Stone Walling, Woodlands, Fencing, Hedging, Footpaths, Sand Dunes, Toolcare, Tree Planting and Aftercare, The Urban Handbook, Waterways and Wetlands!!!

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