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Gill



Joined: 18 Jul 2006
Posts: 244

PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 09 11:31 am    Post subject: New Lathe  Reply with quote    

Knowing how much I enjoy woodwork, Santa bought me a new Jet mini-lathe . I've been trying it out and managed to turn a square block of pine into a round cylinder with a few round-over decorations on it.

I never thought I'd be able to use a lathe - they look so scary. Woo hoo! I'm really proud of myself.

AnnaD



Joined: 12 Jun 2007
Posts: 2777
Location: Edinburgh
PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 09 5:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

How very cool! Have you got any projects planned for it yet?
I'd love to try woodworking, especially with a lathe.

Gill



Joined: 18 Jul 2006
Posts: 244

PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 09 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

One day I would like to make some pens, but I'll have to make a lot of sawdust before I'm good enough. I'm thinking my first goal should perhaps be something like a set of bar room skittles.

It's incredibly mesmeric, watching the wood spin round and round as a small pile of shavings accumulates. I bet it's a good treatment for stress; mind, I wouldn't know because I do everything I can to avoid getting stressed in the first place.

Mutton



Joined: 09 May 2009
Posts: 1508

PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 09 6:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Stress - depends on what you are trying to make. Knew a wood turner once who made rattles and ring goblets amongst many other things. So you are making a spindle, with knobs on either end and rings in the middle of it, all from a block of wood.
His wife said that she could hear when it was ring goblet time.

hedgehogpie



Joined: 02 May 2006
Posts: 684
Location: Kent
PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 09 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

If you want an excercise in meditation, try a pole lathe. They're just lovely to use.

Silas



Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 6848
Location: Staffordshire
PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 09 11:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Gill wrote:
One day I would like to make some pens, but I'll have to make a lot of sawdust before I'm good enough. I'm thinking my first goal should perhaps be something like a set of bar room skittles.

It's incredibly mesmeric, watching the wood spin round and round as a small pile of shavings accumulates. I bet it's a good treatment for stress; mind, I wouldn't know because I do everything I can to avoid getting stressed in the first place.



Hmmm.....
Not a good choice for a beginner, you have to make nine pieces almost exactly the same.

I'd do a candlestick or a goblet.

Bodrighy



Joined: 15 Aug 2008
Posts: 2157
Location: Near Devizes
PostPosted: Wed Dec 30, 09 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hi Gill.

Welcome to the slippery slope. Try a few simpler things such as dibbers, small bowls etc first. A skittle is fairly easy but getting nine the same is more difficult though it would certainly be good practice. Have you got a chuck or faceplate with it? Give me a shout if you need a hand or go on the lathe section in the other forum.

The Jet mini is a lovely little lathe and the only limitations I found with mine were size. What tools do you have with it?

pete

Gill



Joined: 18 Jul 2006
Posts: 244

PostPosted: Wed Dec 30, 09 11:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Okay, I'll think again about the skittles as a first project, but they'll still remain an early aspiration . Dibbers sound like a good idea.

I don't have the attachment you need to turn bowls, so I'm limited to spindles for the time being. My hubby has a 'grown up' lathe which he rarely uses, so I've been able to snaffle his gouges and chisels. Pugh's are about to hold one of their regular woodwork tools and timber auctions at Ledbury, so I shall look at their catalogue when it is published and see if there are any turning tools. If there are, I might pop down.

Bodrighy



Joined: 15 Aug 2008
Posts: 2157
Location: Near Devizes
PostPosted: Wed Dec 30, 09 12:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

You should have got a faceplate with the lathe as standard. You can use that to make bowls. Spindle work you can make loads of things, rolling pins, bobbins, crochet hooks dibbers, fishing priests, rattles, honey dippers, mashers, gavels , drop spindles the list goes on. Have a look here for more ideas

Pete

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 15385
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Wed Dec 30, 09 12:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Gill wrote:
I don't have the attachment you need to turn bowls...

I just use the faceplate, ok my bowls are not great, but they're not bad.
Screw the block to the plate (use brass screws). Turn the back of the bowl, and put a flat bottom on it, then unscrew it and glue it to the faceplate with hot melt glue.
Turn the inside of the bowl, then heat up the faceplate until the glue melts enough to get the bowl off.

JohnB



Joined: 09 Jul 2005
Posts: 685
Location: Beautiful sunny West Wales!
PostPosted: Wed Dec 30, 09 8:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The Jet looks quite impressive. I've had a set of turning tools and a book for years, but the lathe I was given had a cracked casting, so I never got to use it. I'm really tempted to get one. I'd like something that I can learn on, but that I could also make stuff on to sell, if I'm good enough. I've got the trees, I need to add value to them!

Are there alternatives to the Jet I should consider? What would I need to buy in addition to the basic lathe?

Gill



Joined: 18 Jul 2006
Posts: 244

PostPosted: Wed Dec 30, 09 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I did get a faceplate and now I know what to do with it - thanks . I'm not sure I'm brave enough to try the hot glue technique, though. I'd be too worried about the consequences of it failing.

Why do turners have such passionate debates about different types of chucks? I'm sure I've seen chucks with jaws which open and close so you can grip the workpiece. Is it a good idea to acquire one of those in the long term? Are they a standard fit? They seem rather pricey.

John - The choice of my lathe was based on the fact that I don't have much room in my workshop so I needed something that could be mounted on a bench, then put away when not in use. It's still quite weighty, though. It's also rated by the retailer (Axminster Power Tools) for trade use, so it should be much more durable than something that is hobby rated. If you don't already have facilities to sharpen your tools, you will almost certainly need a grinding wheel or something similar. I'm fortunate in that I already have a Tormek.

JohnB



Joined: 09 Jul 2005
Posts: 685
Location: Beautiful sunny West Wales!
PostPosted: Wed Dec 30, 09 9:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Gill wrote:
John - The choice of my lathe was based on the fact that I don't have much room in my workshop so I needed something that could be mounted on a bench, then put away when not in use. It's still quite weighty, though. It's also rated by the retailer (Axminster Power Tools) for trade use, so it should be much more durable than something that is hobby rated. If you don't already have facilities to sharpen your tools, you will almost certainly need a grinding wheel or something similar. I'm fortunate in that I already have a Tormek.

I've looked at the Axminster site, and that's probably where I'd get it from if I buy one. Space isn't a problem for me, but I don't want to spend too much. It looks like a good machine for the price, but I'm now a long way from anywhere I could look at one (as far as I know). The trade use rating is certainly part of the appeal.

I do need a new grinder, as I dumped my old one when I sold my last house, as it was a bit past it. The Tormek looks expensive with the jigs for sharpening all the tools I could use it for. Have to think carefully about that.

Silas



Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 6848
Location: Staffordshire
PostPosted: Wed Dec 30, 09 10:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

My grinding wheel was the cheapest I could get. I works fine.If you press the tool hard against the stone it slows down to a crawl, but you don't need to do that, you just need to put an edge on your tool.

Bodrighy



Joined: 15 Aug 2008
Posts: 2157
Location: Near Devizes
PostPosted: Wed Dec 30, 09 10:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hot glue is nott infallible but as long as you leave it to get really hot it should be fine. Wood turning is all about experimenting when you start as you will get as many different types of advice as there are turners. The chucks make life a heck of a lot easier and for your lathe which has a 1 X8 thread the choice is endless. Wait until you can afford a decent one though as the chap ones tend to be a bit of a waste of money. With a face plate you can do most things that you need or want to. Try screwing a piece of scrap wood onto it, turn it round then glue your blank to that, the join iis less likely to come off as the metal cools the glue too fast, especially at this time of year.

When you are starting try using your lathe at the slowest speed which is only 400 on yours and make sure you are wearing a face mask (cheap ones are about 6 and work fine) then if / when something does come off you are safe. You obviously have plenty of practice doing intricate things so I am looking forward to seeing what you come up with in the future. Have a look at Cindy Drozda's website, she uses a mini lathe for 90% of her work and produces beautiful work. All her finials are spindle work as well.

Pete

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