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Log Cabin living in a garden
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Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 10 8:47 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Calli wrote:
Rob R wrote:
10k isn't a lot for residental spec, depending upon the size.


Not even close by my research.

Don't go by the quoted figures as they often don't include the landworks and expensive stuff.

It isn't cheap to dig out and lay foundations, as for the amenities?? sheesh



I reckon you should double the cost of the kit for an erected price.

Blue Sky



Joined: 30 Jan 2005
Posts: 7654
Location: France
PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 10 9:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

chrysalis wrote:
Hi both - thanks for speedy replies & encouragement

I had seen that temp dwelling on your land site, but does that just apply to something like a field or wood? This would be in an established garden. I was hoping to install compost loo, solar energy, etc (and use daughter's tumble drier, etc., in the winter for a small fee )

Chrysalis


Great idea. Let us know how you get on.

and WELCOME!

wellington womble



Joined: 08 Nov 2004
Posts: 14972
Location: East Midlands
PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 10 12:12 pm    Post subject: Re: Another daft question ... Reply with quote    

chrysalis wrote:
would you need PP to have one of those lovely gipsy caravans I've seen somewhere else on DS in your garden?

Chrysalis


Planning permission is granted for use of a building, as well as the building itself. In my experience (which is very negative, but reasonably wide) you would be very unlikely to get planning permission for such a project, but there is no reason why you shouldn't try - you might be luckier than we were.

Cobnut



Joined: 29 Aug 2008
Posts: 475
Location: North Herefordshire
PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 10 12:34 pm    Post subject: Re: Log Cabin living in a garden Reply with quote    

chrysalis wrote:
....Do you reckon they'd need PP? Has anyone tried this?

Chrysalis


I asked my local planning dept if I could live in an eco-friendly, off grid, caravan in my own paddock [if I sold my cottage but kept that bit] and they said absolutely not. The reason was because I live in open countryside and the policy is strictly no new builds or new residential properties. Even though the caravan in moveable, as I’d be living in it for more than 28 days per year, it would be classes as a residential property and therefore not allowed. On the other hand they were likely to allow me to build a granny annex, especially if it was attached to the cottage (even though they'd just said NO WAY to new residential properties ). So I’d imagine if you plan to live in it full time you’d need PP unfortunately.

lettucewoman



Joined: 26 Sep 2006
Posts: 7834
Location: Tiptoe in the Forest!!
PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 10 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Another way of doing it might be to sell the house and move into a park home...this is what we did when we decided that we didn't want to saddle ourselves with a mortgage at 49 and 50 years old...we own our home, its the size of a bungalow, easy to maintain, and the only rent we pay is for the land whch includes the water and is just over 100 a month.

sako



Joined: 11 Oct 2009
Posts: 37

PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 10 2:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It might say something in the deeds that might forbid any development as you describe.
But personally i would't do it, downsize and live mortgage free.
ATB
Richard

chrysalis



Joined: 24 Jul 2010
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 10 3:09 pm    Post subject: Thanks ... Reply with quote    

for all your advice and encouragement but I reckon it's back to the drawing board for me.

I'll let you know how I get on.

Chrysalis X

frewen



Joined: 08 Sep 2005
Posts: 11405

PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 10 3:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Please do - it's always good to test these ideas out

Mrs R



Joined: 15 Aug 2008
Posts: 7202

PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 10 4:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

What about the granny annex idea though - if this is in your daughter's garden and you are about to retire, could you not start mentioning something about your poor old hips and needing somewhere with no stairs, close to your daughter so she can care for you?

woody guthrie



Joined: 28 Jan 2009
Posts: 209
Location: Cork, Ireland
PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 10 4:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

My mother and father sold their house, money in the bank and moved to a flat in a town centre so they were close to all the amenities and services and now have great life spending my inheritance. Good on them, I hope to do the same for my children.

T.G



Joined: 13 Sep 2009
Posts: 7280
Location: Somewhere you're not
PostPosted: Mon Jul 26, 10 10:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I worked for a company which made log cabins- pinelog products, I recall then that they made a variety from garden to holiday and residential, they were very big back then but now they are much smaller and even back in the late 80's they cost a lot more than 10k. Transportation is costly, it’s around £500 for a static, and their log cabin come in two halves, so that would be at least 1K just to have it delivered.

They used to have wheels underneath them so they are still classed as caravans as they are not ‘permanently’ sited so as to skirt around some of the PP rules, and I know some are site permanently, I think the quality of build and type of log cabin goes a long way to convincing PPA.

But what is the access like to the plot you have your eye on? If the PP came through on a type more rigidly built would you be able to actually get it to the site the permission was granted on or would you have to have it craned in or some such?

Barefoot Andrew
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 21 Mar 2007
Posts: 22780
Location: In the 17th century
PostPosted: Mon Jul 26, 10 12:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Welcome chrysalis
A.

chrysalis



Joined: 24 Jul 2010
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Mon Jul 26, 10 9:25 pm    Post subject: Me again ... Reply with quote    

... Just wondering if it would work to share the proceeds of my house sale between my two girls, once I sounded No 1 and her hubby about selling their flat and buying a house (which they have wanted to for a long time) with a garage they could get PP for, and convert this into a granny bedsit.

I know lots of people would be worried about sharing like this with their kids, but we are all very close and get along together really well. They are very settled in the area they live, near his parents, etc., and although things can change, they would not be planning to do so.

All this would not only help me, but would enable them to move on up the ladder sooner, rather than having to wait for me to pop my clogs. It would also add value to a new house for them, when I eventually shuffle off ... sorry, this is starting to sound morbid - I'm not planning to go anywhere else for some time yet!

Chrysalis

Chez



Joined: 13 Aug 2006
Posts: 35907
Location: The Hive of the Uberbee, Quantock Hills, Somerset
PostPosted: Mon Jul 26, 10 9:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I am really, REALLY cautious about speculating on the property market - which is kind of what you are doing, talking about 'moving up the ladder' ... . Not saying it's not right for you and your family; but we have had such a bad experience of the 'property ladder' that the whole thing gives me the wiggins.

What about a static caravan? You can get very comfortable ones, with double glazing and under-floor heating. And you would be retaining your financial independence to some extent. I know you can't legislate for fate, but if your daughter died, what would happen? Or split with her husband? Do those things need to be written down formally?

I sound really negative, I know - but we lost our house two years ago because of the property market. I tend to look on the dark side before I start to look at the positives .

lottie



Joined: 11 Aug 2005
Posts: 5059
Location: ceredigion
PostPosted: Mon Jul 26, 10 9:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Chez wrote:
I am really, REALLY cautious about speculating on the property market - which is kind of what you are doing, talking about 'moving up the ladder' ... . Not saying it's not right for you and your family; but we have had such a bad experience of the 'property ladder' that the whole thing gives me the wiggins.

What about a static caravan? You can get very comfortable ones, with double glazing and under-floor heating. And you would be retaining your financial independence to some extent. I know you can't legislate for fate, but if your daughter died, what would happen? Or split with her husband? Do those things need to be written down formally?

I sound really negative, I know - but we lost our house two years ago because of the property market. I tend to look on the dark side before I start to look at the positives .

Exactly what I was trying to say---I've seen this kind of arrangement go really pearshaped for a friend of mine when her daughter died and her son in law remarried.

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