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Dutch Elm Disease and ask Die Back?
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dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35514
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 15 1:12 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    


Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34027
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 15 1:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Slim wrote:
Hairyloon wrote:

In England, sycamore is a species of maple...


Fixed that for you


Oh, I've missed you.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 15 2:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

[quote="Slim:1443237"]
Hairyloon wrote:

In England, sycamore is a species of maple...

I don't live in England (Cornish) & neither does Bodger who lives in Wales.
Yet the Sycamore is as common in these parts of the British Isles as in England.

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34027
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 15 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Has anyone got that Can Of Worms icon, please?

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35514
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 15 2:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    



i have been tree watching round here,york (england)and although there has been quite a few horse chestnuts felled by the"red weeping death" of some horrid fungal infection so far there seems to be no signs of the other recently recorded tree pathogens such as ash dieback and the various "exotic "diseases.

im hoping it stays like that cos there do seem to be a lot of "new"tree killers arriving.

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 15264
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 15 3:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Tavascarow wrote:
Slim wrote:
Hairyloon wrote:

In England, sycamore is a species of maple...

I don't live in England (Cornish) & neither does Bodger who lives in Wales.
Yet the Sycamore is as common in these parts of the British Isles as in England.
As I said: in English, the sycamore is a maple.
Folk in America ought to learn to talk proper.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 15 5:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hairyloon wrote:
Tavascarow wrote:
Slim wrote:
Hairyloon wrote:

In England, sycamore is a species of maple...

I don't live in England (Cornish) & neither does Bodger who lives in Wales.
Yet the Sycamore is as common in these parts of the British Isles as in England.
As I said: in English, the sycamore is a maple.
Folk in America ought to learn to talk proper.

Tis why the edicated use latin.
I've missed Slim as well.

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34027
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 15 5:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Tavascarow wrote:
Hairyloon wrote:
Tavascarow wrote:
Slim wrote:
Hairyloon wrote:

In England, sycamore is a species of maple...

I don't live in England (Cornish) & neither does Bodger who lives in Wales.
Yet the Sycamore is as common in these parts of the British Isles as in England.
As I said: in English, the sycamore is a maple.
Folk in America ought to learn to talk proper.

Tis why the edicated use latin.
I've missed Slim as well.


Yes, those posts from New Cornwall are always welcome.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5377
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 15 5:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hairyloon wrote:
Tavascarow wrote:
Slim wrote:
Hairyloon wrote:

In England, sycamore is a species of maple...

I don't live in England (Cornish) & neither does Bodger who lives in Wales.
Yet the Sycamore is as common in these parts of the British Isles as in England.
As I said: in English, the sycamore is a maple.
Folk in America ought to learn to talk proper.



Back to the "living language" debates ... don't forget that you folks saying "nappy" is just a weird neo-logism, and that we Americans saying "diaper" is more true to the past.

At any rate, that tree pictured is an Acer and therefore, diseases that afflict the Platanus genus need not be considered in this case

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 15264
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 15 6:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Slim wrote:
At any rate, that tree pictured is an Acer and therefore, diseases that afflict the Platanus genus need not be considered in this case

Probably right, but I heard that sudden-oak death was killing larch...
(that's Quercus and Larix for avoidance of doubt).

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5377
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 15 6:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hairyloon wrote:
larch


You mean tamarack?

We actually call them larch most of the time here.... But I could have gone with Hackmatack

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 15 7:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hairyloon wrote:
Slim wrote:
At any rate, that tree pictured is an Acer and therefore, diseases that afflict the Platanus genus need not be considered in this case

Probably right, but I heard that sudden-oak death was killing larch...
(that's Quercus and Larix for avoidance of doubt).

& the fungus that causes sudden oak is carried & spread by rhododendron ponticum.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35514
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 15 10:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Slim wrote:
Hairyloon wrote:
larch


You mean tamarack?

We actually call them larch most of the time here.... But I could have gone with Hackmatack



would that be the first nation names?

some uk "first nation" plant names are quite good ,dur=oak and gives words such as durable,enduring etc etc

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 15 11:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:
Slim wrote:
Hairyloon wrote:
larch


You mean tamarack?

We actually call them larch most of the time here.... But I could have gone with Hackmatack



would that be the first nation names?

some uk "first nation" plant names are quite good ,dur=oak and gives words such as durable,enduring etc etc

I love this site. So which of our first nation tongues is that one from?
I've just checked the online Cornish dictionary & the translation for oak is Dar down here.

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 4260
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 15 11:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

And Derw or Derwen in Welsh

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