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tomato experiment
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dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 42254
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri May 20, 22 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

setting the rig to get the best parts of the spectrum from the right direction for each stage of growth is normal for "artificial" conditions

using such knowledge outside at field scale makes sense as well

the impact of the materials at every stage needs thought and balancing against the gains from doing it to be ethical and sustainable

more crop, etc vs it needs a lot of plastic sheets which need to be made and have a decent end of use policy

an "organic" version made from plant cellulose and "earth" pigments might be possible

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 9122
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Fri May 20, 22 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

interesting to see how it works out

Having some trials with tomatoes this year, struggled with cold, followed by accidentally cooking my seedlings with unexpected hot weather. now have toms in gh, but they are way behind. in my other gh I have some sort of pest, which is eating the roots of anything I plant, killing the plants. I had a small issue the same last year. I have been out day and night with torch to try and find the pesties, but not finding them - but the style of damage suggests some sort of cutting worm/weevil. I have, for the first time in my life, decided to try nematodes, it feels like that or not use the greenhouse ever again.

not looking like it will be a tomato glut year for me. Good I can use up last years frozen......

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13980

PostPosted: Sat May 21, 22 7:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

They might be vine weevils Nicky. We have had those on our indoor plants, and the only way we found with them was to take the plant out of the pot, carefully clean off any grubs we found the pour boiling water over the compost. Not really practical on a greenhouse scale unless you can get some sort of high temperature steriliser, but works at the pot scale.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 42254
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat May 21, 22 8:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

nematodes are rather effective

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 6225
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Sat May 21, 22 9:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Sounds like I should be grateful to not know about vine weevils...
Over here I would suggest also checking for seed corn maggot, though I don't know if you have them there. Nematodes would also be effective for them.

Have you evaluated your risk for damping off organisms? I've seen situations where pythium gets out of control in greenhouse soil. Nematodes would not help with damping off diseases...

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 9122
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Sat May 21, 22 4:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Slim wrote:
Sounds like I should be grateful to not know about vine weevils...
Over here I would suggest also checking for seed corn maggot, though I don't know if you have them there. Nematodes would also be effective for them.

Have you evaluated your risk for damping off organisms? I've seen situations where pythium gets out of control in greenhouse soil. Nematodes would not help with damping off diseases...


it is definitely something eating them - the roots are eaten away and the 'bark' of the stems stripped, then the stems eaten. It is not the style of slugs or snails, a foe I am familiar with. I have applied a broad spectrum nematode, as my research points to various larvae/ grubs of various moths or weevils, and all I can do is continue to replace plants and see if the problem stops. Last year only tomatoes were killed, and I grew lots of cucumbers, but this year the pesties took out a courgette plant that was thriving, then suddenly not. Everything above ground looks ok, but suddenly droopy, dig under the soil and the stem is chewed through, the other roots gone.

I think nematodes are a relatively ok thing to use. and I have to do something to get my greenhouse back.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 42254
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue May 24, 22 4:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

still alive, they have sticks and upcycled cable

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 42254
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Jun 01, 22 11:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

hooves crossed this is not a curse, they seem to be thriving

i might add a bit more shiny on the side of the shed

3 times as big as they were

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13980

PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 22 7:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

As long as they aren't long and thin, sounds hopeful.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 42254
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 22 8:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

they are a tall one and a squat one, both have good shapes, proportions and are a nice colour for the type, it does seem to be working

i will do a snap later

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 42254
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 22 12:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    


Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13980

PostPosted: Fri Jun 03, 22 8:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

They look good. More advanced than mine in the greenhouse. I have one set of flowers on one, but they aren't really tall enough to need support yet.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 42254
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Jun 03, 22 12:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

there is now an upcycled mirror against the shed under the mesh thing

it gives extra at almost full spectrum for the next couple of feet upwards

they are heliotropic but seem to think it is always midday on the equator in terms of shape
ideal for things in a newgrange corner

hooves crossed, so far this seems worth the effort

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 42254
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Jun 03, 22 2:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

i almost consumed a second instar ladybird nymph, opps, i did notice and it was added to the tomato plants

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 7262
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Mon Jun 06, 22 8:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

They are looking really good DPack. Sorry if you have already said this but what variety is it?

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